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[This Week in Medicine] January 5–11, 2013

On Dec 28, 2012, the UK Department of Health launched a new hard-hitting anti-smoking campaign to encourage New Year's resolutions to kick the habit. The campaign, which will run until March, 2013, includes the statistic that every 15 cigarettes smoke ...

[Editorial] Global polio eradication: not there yet

On Dec 31, the world missed the deadline for the 24-year-old Global Polio Eradication Initiative to halt all wild poliovirus transmission by the end of 2012. Set in 1988, WHO's original target—global eradication of polio by the year 2000—has been exte ...

[Editorial] Sexual violence: a global awakening, from India

The rape and murder of a 23-year-old female physiotherapy student from Delhi—six men have been arrested for the attack, which took place on Dec 16—has rightly caused outrage and anguish across India. Immediately after her death, following treatment in a ho ...

[Editorial] Opening up about mental health

For too long, people with severe mental illnesses in the UK have received poor care, according to Care and Support Minister, Norman Lamb. To improve services, the government has pledged £1·2 million to a pilot scheme in which six National Health Service si ...

[Comment] Early-life prevention of non-communicable diseases

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are major causes of death worldwide and underlie almost two-thirds of all global deaths. Although all countries face epidemics of these diseases, low-income and middle-income countries, and the poorest and most vulnerable p ...

[Comment] RELAX-AHF: rising from the doldrums in acute heart failure

After a decade of acute heart failure trials, reported in The Lancet, represents an important step forward. ...

[This Week in Medicine] January 12–18, 2013

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of bedaquiline as part of combination treatments for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) when there are no other options available. Despite some associated risks, bedaquiline fills an unmet nee ...

[Editorial] Obesity: many hands to make light(er) work

Westminster City Council in London, UK, recently offered the provocative proposal that benefit or welfare payments could be “varied to reward or incentivise” people who were prescribed exercise classes, as a public health measure for those deemed to be ove ...

[Editorial] Boosting services for people with sickle-cell disease

The Igbo people of Nigeria called them Ogbanje—malevolent children destined to be lazy and die and be reborn repeatedly. Particular families were plagued by such children who usually died before their 10th birthday. Belief in Ogbanje is centuries old, but ...

[Editorial] Reporting deaths in Syria: room for review

On Jan 2, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights issued a press release with the shocking figure of 59 648 individuals killed during the Syrian conflict between March, 2011, and November, 2012. The UN commissioned report, Preliminary Stati ...

[Comment] SPIRIT 2013: new guidance for content of clinical trial protocols

The protocol is an important document that details the background, methods, ethical considerations, and administration of a clinical trial. The information contained in the protocol is useful for several groups. For those involved in the trial, the protoco ...

[Comment] Comparing diabetes drugs—helping clinical decisions?

Comparative effectiveness research has become an important line of investigation in many aspects of medicine, but is especially important in diabetes. Many drug classes are available, and to choose which second-line treatment to add to metformin might be c ...

[Comment] Everolimus for astrocytomas in tuberous sclerosis complex

Tuberous sclerosis complex is a variegated complex disease characterised by the occurrence of benign hamartomas in several organs, including skin, kidney, lung, and brain, and neuropsychological complications such as mental retardation, autism, and epileps ...

[Comment] Full hazards of smoking and benefits of stopping for women

Coinciding with the centenary of Richard Doll's birth on Oct 28, 1912, and the 50th anniversary of the landmark 1962 report Smoking and Health by the Royal College of Physicians, an account of the full eventual hazards of prolonged smoking and the ben ...

[Comment] Sickle-cell disorders: limits of descriptive epidemiology

The global mapping of sickle haemoglobin (HbS) allele frequencies in neonates at a fine-grained 5×5 km resolution, undertaken by Frédéric Piel and colleagues in The Lancet, uses a new approach extended from work on malaria (with which haemoglobin variation ...

[Comment] Offline: The real meaning of innovation

Mention the word Afghanistan and one might conjure up images of terrorism, violence, and political mayhem. Western armed forces are now approaching the end of their latest period of military intervention, leaving a precariously prepared Afghan civil societ ...

[World Report] High-risk drug practices tighten grip on London gay scene

Use of crystal methamphetamine is on the rise in London's gay scene, putting men who have sex with men at higher risk of infections. Tony Kirby and Michelle Thornber-Dunwell report. ...

[World Report] HIV prevention: new pilots for beleaguered Swaziland

Swaziland, which has the world's highest incidence of HIV, is embarking on pilot projects to offer treatment to people who are HIV-positive, irrespective of their CD4 count. Barbara Sibbald reports. ...

[Perspectives] On the shoulders of giants

If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giantsIsaac Newton, 1676 ...

[This Week in Medicine] January 19–25, 2013

A public health emergency has been declared in Boston, MA, USA, because of a particularly severe influenza season. 700 cases and four influenza-related deaths have been reported in the city since Oct 1, 2012, compared with just 70 cases in the whole of the ...

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Peer-reviewed research articles are not included in the Health Well's catalogues which principally focus on "grey literature". 

On this page you will find summaries of research articles published in Open Access Journals and drawn down by RSS feeds from those journals . These journals cover about a quarter of all peer-reviewed journal articles and so are not comprehensive. In addition, the Health Well's topic-managers supplement these summaries with research articles from topic-related online journals.

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